Music Matters

I love music, I like to sing, its great to sing with others.

I also hate music, I hate singing and sometimes I hate singing with others.

Why? Cause it sounds terrible and I sound terrible and everyone around me doesn’t care.

So when I go to church (or chapel @ college), I have a love/hate relationship with music. Some weeks I love it, others I can’t stand it. The problem is that music is such a divisive thing, as well as also being something that can be done well and also done poorly.

So often I want to join with Larry Norman and cry out ‘Why does the devil have all the good music?’

Why do I feel part of the community in ‘The Cove’ singing at a Sydney FC match, than when I’m with my brothers and sisters about my Lord and Saviour Jesus?

Have we lost passion in our worship?

Why are we afraid to be emotional when we sing?

What’s wrong with being charismatic?

(On a related side note, the people over at the Mars Hill Music Dept. (Doxologist), have released a song repository. They are so loving sharing all their resources for free, with MP3’s and sheet (chords) music. How awesome, helping other Christians with great resources)

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9 Responses to Music Matters

  1. Dave Miers says:

    it’s the sin of overreactionism (not sure if this term has been coined yet?).

    the charismatic movement has swung the pendulum excessively toward experience being my ultimate authority.

    conservative evangelicals (rightly wanting to keep the scriptures as their final authority) react against that by going the opposite direction and removing any hint of emotionalism so as to distance themselves from the charismatic movement.

    i believe this is an overreaction.

    at the ground level of the critique (ie those who don’t really engage with real theological differences) it is perceived that raising your hands in the air is what it means to be charismatic… so i won’t raise my hands!!

    there are plenty of Christians around the world who are passionate in their singing, raise their hands, but don’t believe dodgy power and prosperity doctrine.

  2. Duke says:

    I totally agree with you on the overreactionism comment.

    But I’m not sure if not raising your hands because you don’t want people to think you are charismatic and worshipping God only with your emotions is the right solution.

    If Godly leaders, who faithfully proclaim the Gospel are not afraid to express emotion, whether by hand raising or otherwise, then the congregation around them who see this and understand that this leader (who holds scripture as final authority) is worshipping with all of his heart and body (as well as mind) will be encouraged to follow likewise.They don’t put emotions first, but still come to Jesus with all of their life.

    I’m not saying all people need to do it that way, and for some people that’s not their thing. But I know for myself, it is my own pride and not wanting to be seen as weird (not charismatic) that prevents me. Which is sinful and I need to repent of this.

    I think sometimes our leaders are to blame when singing is flat, because they are flat, and not leading others to worship God with their emotions (both in corporate song and in all their life).

  3. Alee says:

    (On that side note. . .)

    I forwarded that site to my brother. He’s in the band for the college worship group and figured he’d love it. Thanks!

  4. Dave Miers says:

    But I’m not sure if not raising your hands because you don’t want people to think you are charismatic and worshipping God only with your emotions is the right solution.

    just making sure you know… i wasn’t advocating that view… just expressing that that’s what i think happens at the ground level.

    But I know for myself, it is my own pride and not wanting to be seen as weird (not charismatic) that prevents me. Which is sinful and I need to repent of this.

    what’s the plan of attack for repentance?

  5. Greg says:

    Yeh they’re some good points,

    I think its got more to do with the biblical imperative (command) to let the word of Christ dwell as you sing to God rather than simply a personal expression of faith (while that may be what looks like). Col 3:16 “Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly, teaching and admonishing one another in all wisdom, singing psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, with thankfulness in your hearts to God” ESV. Notice the emphasis on the word dwelling in us in everything we do whether teaching or admonishing (warning/ instructing) or singing.

    Also note the gratitude in your hearts to God which comes from what he has done in us through Jesus (NB the entire chapter esp. 3:1-5). This has got to overflow doesn’t it? How can it not?

    So SING and sing loud with all of yourself, whatever that means. Is he not worth it? Are we not thankful for it? He is certainly worth my voice and more … be real.

    Tim Baldwin is preaching on this at Saturday ev this weekend or next. Check out podcast at saturdayev.com if you can’t make it.

  6. Duke says:

    Sorry Dave for misunderstanding what you said, it all makes sense now, so easy to do when reading opinion in text rather than conversation in person (also why the ’emergent’ blogosphere conversation can be so pointless because views are so hard to pin down)

    Have watched that, will need to watch it again, was a bit distracted when I did the first time. So will share once I watch it again.

    Great point Greg, Problem is I don’t see that in people though, the word doesn’t overflow.

    Is that because people aren’t being hit by what God has done for us in Jesus?

    Or does it go back to simply a culture change we need to make in the church so that we express that overflow?

  7. Pingback: dave miers dot com » Jesus Life Culture Design #6

  8. Dan says:

    I know I’ve jumped on this late… But this is all mad!
    I’m stoked people in ‘our circles’ are having this discussion. Never would have five years ago.

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